Communities of fate and the challenges of international public participation in transnational governance contexts

Abstract

A trans-national public consultation on climate change was held in 38 countries to provide citizen input to the 2009 UN Framework on Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP15) meeting in Copenhagen. The uniform process involving 100 citizens in the participating countries focused on the key policy questions debated by participating countries. Based on the Canadian experience with this consultation and interviews with 13 other project managers primarily from developing countries, this paper explores several areas of tension: the tensions between the goals of uniformity and standardization versus recognition and accommodation of cultural complexities; the global versus local contexts; public ‘deficits’ versus capacities and capacity-building; the importance of tailoring for policy impacts versus exploring the values behind policy choices; and the complexities afforded by the issue itself. The paper concludes that these tensions are unavoidable in public consultations in transnational governance contexts involving global issues. These tensions need to be explicitly recognized and accommodated, while acknowledging the continuing importance of public consultation experiments in these transnational contexts.

Keywords

Canadian climate change consultation, UN Framework on climate change, public understanding of science, climate change, worldwide views, transnational public consultations

How to Cite

Einsiedel E., (2013) “Communities of fate and the challenges of international public participation in transnational governance contexts”, Journal of Public Deliberation 9(2). doi: https://doi.org/10.16997/jdd.166

114

Views

23

Downloads

Share

Authors

Edna F. Einsiedel (University of Calgary)

Download

Issue

Dates

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

Identifiers

Peer Review

This article has been peer reviewed.

File Checksums (MD5)

  • PDF: 5b6248b8bcfcf83ea719d94a03d879d4